Kate Middleton wore a tiara during royal tour of Pakistan

Kate Middleton just had a tiara moment in Pakistan

The Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William visited the same hospital Princess Diana did in 1997

Kate Middleton is no strange to sparkling headpieces. Since marrying Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge has dazzled wearing tiaras on special occasions, including state dinners and receptions at Buckingham Palace, and, of course her 2011 wedding, which marked her first. However, for the first time on a royal tour, the mom of three wore a tiara, and it might be our favorite one to date!

The Duchess wore a tiara while visiting a young girl at the hospital

While visiting the Shaukat Khanum hospital in Lahore on Thursday, October 17, the Duchess sat at seven-year-old Wafia Rehmani’s bedside, wearing a tiara with the young patient in her hospital room. The pair enjoyed a toy tea party in their matching tiaras, alongside William. Wafia, who wants to be a doctor, also showed the royals her toy medical set.

MORE: Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle match in green on night out with their Princes

The Duke and Duchess visited with children in the hospital’s chemotherapy ward. During the engagement, the couple met a young boy who wants to be a soldier. William played with his fishing game as the they competed to hook fish. Prince George’s parents retraced Princess Diana’s footsteps on Thursday visiting the same hospital the late Princess of Wales visited in 1996 and in 1997, the year she passed. Earlier in the day, Kate delivered her first speech on the tour, trying her hand at Urdu, which is the official language of Pakistan. 

Kate Middleton delivered a speech at the SOS Children's village in Lahore, Pakistan

“Parents, children, aunts, uncles, grandparents all play important roles — you have reminded us exactly what family means,” she said at the SOS Children’s Village, a charity that provides a home and family structure to over 150 kids. “You have shown us too that it is not simply a term that describes the relationship between blood relatives. Instead it describes those special bonds we share with those who make us feel safe and supported. It is the quality of those relationships that matters.”

“Earlier this year I talked about the fact that it takes a village to raise a child. The village we have seen here today is the best representation of that ideal that I could have possibly imagined,” Kate continued. “Together as a village you are transforming children's lives and providing them with strong foundations to support all their families.”

More about