In a move that has surprised the industry, Donatella Versace has announced that her fashion house will no longer be using animal fur in its designs. Known for over-the-top pieces, this progressive statement is one that was not expected from the Italian designer whose creations are worn by A-listers such as Jennifer Lopez, Lady Gaga, and Jennifer Lawrence. “Fur? I’m out of that,” she told The Economist's 1843 magazine in a recent interview. “I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion. It doesn’t feel right.”

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Versace SS18 fashion showVIEW GALLERY Models were seen wearing animal-print during Versace's Spring/Summer '18 runway show Photo: Getty Images

In the past year alone, big-name designers like Furla, Tom Ford, Gucci and Givenchy have all put forth statements saying that their brands will no longer be using real fur in their designs. Instead, they've said they are going to be leaning towards animal-friendly and high-end faux furs. It's not clear if her fashion-forward industry friends or dog Audrey influenced Donatella's decision, nonetheless this is a good step towards pleasing a more-aware society and supporters of the animal rights organization PETA. The non-profit is even sending the Italian designer a box of fox-shaped vegan chocolate cookies to thank her for making this decision. 

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The brand had previously resisted joining the growing group of fashion designers taking this stance. Versace's Fall/Winter 2017 collection included laser-cut mink and fox coats. While many are celebrating Donatella's new position, the International Fur Federation has stated that they are disappointed in her decision, according to WWD. “The majority of top designers will continue to work with fur as they know it is a natural product that is produced responsibly,” said its CEO Mark Oaten. “With growing concern about the environment and plastics in fashion, I truly believe fur is the natural and responsible choice for designers and consumers.”

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