Eva Longoria on Desperate Housewives

Eva Longoria gets real about that Desperate Housewives 'feud'

Since the curtain fell on the popular ensemble show Desperate Housewives in 2012, Eva Longoria has forged ahead with her Hollywood career as not just an actress but as a producer and director – not to mention getting married to TV exec Jose Bastón and starting a family with the arrival of their adorable son baby Santiago. One of the lingering rumors from the iconic career-changing show, though, was that the show's cast – which included EvaTeri Hatcher, Felicity Huffman, Marcia Cross and Nicollette Sheridan – didn't get along.

The popular ensemble show ran from 2004 to 2012

Contrary to popular belief, though, there was plenty of unity on set. "We had a great sisterhood on Desperate Housewives," she told The Daily Telegraph's Stellar magazine. "But that's not what people wanted to talk about most of the time." In contrast to shows with all-female lineups these days, the rumor mill was more likely to churn back in the days before stars were able to tweet or post their side of the story. 

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"During Desperate Housewives, there was no social media," Eva explains, pointing to the well-known camaraderie on shows like Big Little Lies as a current comparison. "Whereas today Reese [Witherspoon] and Nicole [Kidman] have their own platforms, so you can tell they are very close friends... [But] we didn't have our own channels to debunk rumors, so people didn't get the inside view on how close we all were."

There was a real "sisterhood" among the all-female cast, Eva has revealed

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Eva went on to say that as a Hollywood power player, it's key to support other women. “When you are producing or directing, you go through the door and you’ve got to leave it open for other women,” she said. “Anytime you’re in a position of power or leadership, you have to lead by example and hire women in non-traditional roles. Those traditional male jobs such as cinematographer or stunt coordinator or editor [don’t go to women] not because they are not talented, but because they need to get a foothold."

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